Seborrheic dermatitis: Natural treatments and remedies

Seborrheic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin condition. It often affects the scalp, causing scaly, red patches. The patches may also appear on the face and upper part of the body.  Affected areas may have a secretion of an oily substance into the hair follicles.

Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is caused by an autoimmune response or allergy, and it is not contagious. It is also not curable but can be managed with treatment.

Treatment of SD is not always necessary, as symptoms can clear up naturally. But for most people, SD is a lifelong condition that will continue to flare up and clear up. Proper skin care can help keep symptoms at bay.

Fast facts on seborrheic dermatitis:

  • SD is just as common as acne.
  • The condition affects people of all ages.
  • The condition affects people of all ages.
  • To diagnose SD, a doctor – typically a dermatologist – will examine the affected areas.
  • Someone should speak to their dermatologist or doctor to decide the best treatment.

What is seborrheic dermatitis?

SD can cause a rash that is reddish in color, swollen, greasy, and has a white or yellowish crust.

There are two types of SD:

Cradle cap

Seborrheic Dermatitis or cradle cap on scalp.
Seborrheic dermatitis may occur in infancy, particularly in the form ‘cradle cap’, which affects the scalp.

Cradle cap is common in babies. It causes scaly patches on the baby’s scalp that may be greasy or crusty.

Cradle cap is generally not harmful, and may go away without treatment within a few months. Some babies may get SD in the diaper area, which is usually mistaken for diaper rash.

In rare cases, SD may cover the entire body of the baby, causing red, scaly patches and inflamed skin.

Regardless of the form SD takes in infants, it tends to disappear permanently before the age of one. Choosing topical treatments for children under a year in age should be done in consultation with a doctor.

Read the rest at Medical News Today.

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