Posted in NewLife Outlook

Lifestyle Changes for Managing Back Pain

Living With Back Pain

If you have experienced back pain, you are not alone.

According to one report, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the number of people reporting low back in the United States on a yearly basis is 15 to 20 percent with a lifetime occurrence of over 60 percent. It is the fifth most common reason people visit their doctors.

Back pain has any number of causes. It can result from an injury or stem from a chronic condition, such as arthritis or fibromyalgia, or it can be the result of being overweight and having a sedentary lifestyle.

Most back pain gets better on its own, with or without treatment. Surgery is rarely a necessary done to treat back pain.

There are plenty of lifestyle changes and self-help strategies to help you prevent back pain, manage it, and keep it from coming back.

Keep Moving

If your back is hurting, regular activity can help to relieve inflammation and ease muscle tension.

Exercises for low back pain can you help to strength your back muscles. They also help you to support your spine.

Research finds that most exercise is safe for people with back pain.

You should, however, ask your doctor before starting any exercises for your back, especially if you are in pain. He or she can offer recommendations for effective and safe exercises.

Watch Your Weight

Extra weight, especially in your midsection, makes back pain worse because it shifts your body forward and puts strain on your back.

Maintaining a healthy weight or losing a few pounds can ease your back issues and reduce stress on other joints.

Don’t Smoke

If you smoke, reducing your risk for back pain is a reason to quit.

According to researchers out of Northwestern University (NWU), smokers are more likely to develop chronic pain. The NWU researchers theorize that smoking interferes with brain functions associated with pain.

Another study, published in the American Journal of Medicine, finds that even former smokers are at a higher risk for developing back pain compared to those who have never smoked.

Read the rest at New Life Outlook.

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